Sustainability

Concerts and sustainability. Imagining sustainable live events is now possible

How much does a live event cost in terms of CO2? The question is a must in a summer when, both nationally and internationally, there is much discussion about the environmental impact of concerts. According to calculations published by Duegradi - a web magazine on climate change that collaborates with Lifegate and the Arctic Observatory - a concert in a stadium the size of Rome's Olympic Stadium can end up emitting 500 tons of CO2. That's an enormity when you consider that a possible offset could be achieved by planting more than 8,000 new trees, waiting for them to grow for at least 10 years. They did the calculations, but first took into account everything that a live concert implies at the organizational level: moving the band, entourage, attendees, materials, food and drink, management, security, and energy for the duration of the event. That add up to generating between 2 and 10 kilograms of CO2 equivalent per person, to be multiplied by the number of spectators.

After two years of the Covid-19 pandemic, between restrictions and canceled events, with the live entertainment world economically on its knees, the desire to go back to live music is great. Equally great (or rather, increased in part because of what we have experienced) is the awareness of the stars of the entertainment world themselves of how and how much what they organize-and what makes us feel good-can be impactful to the environment.

One of the bands that has been the most talked about in this regard and has shown attention to environmental issues for years is Coldplay, who announced in the not-so-suspicious times that they were giving up touring until they could find a viable solution to bring them to carbon neutrality. That means minimizing CO2 emissions and offsetting those that cannot be avoided. A couple of weeks ago came the announcement: we are ready to go again. Chris Martin and co. have found a solution to make their events sustainable, limiting the emissions they produce and removing carbon dioxide released into the air. The tour departing in August from London will have concerts powered by renewable energy contained in mobile batteries recharged with solar panels that will be mounted throughout the concert area, but also by harnessing kinetic energy derived from special flooring placed around the stage and electric bikes that spectators can use to the beat of the music. To move from one stage to another, the band will board planes fueled with a mix consisting of classic fuel and a fuel produced from waste cooking oil and animal or natural resources. Even the stages will no longer be the classic ones, having found the solution of being able to make them from environmentally friendly materials such as bamboo and recycled steel. Finally, air. To remove the CO2 produced during the shows, Coldplay will have collection modules powered only by renewable energy installed to suck in carbon dioxide through a filtered fan. The captured carbon dioxide will be used for industrial production of green fuels and carbonated beverages.

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